Dec 28, 2012

Indian POWs in the Ottoman Empire during WWI

with Vedica Kant & Robert Upton

hosted by Chris Gratien

During World War I, over 600,000 troops from South Asia were part of the British army's invasion of Ottoman Iraq. Thousands were taken prisoner in this campaign and became part of a larger story that is the tragedy of the First World War, witnessing and sharing the plight of deported Armenians as they marched across Anatolia. In this podcast, Vedica Kant talks about the experience of Indian POWs in the Ottoman Empire as well as that of Ottoman soldiers captured by the British army and brought to India and Burma, with additional commentary by Robert Upton regarding military recruitment in British India and the complex relationship between imperialism, war, and nationalism for Indian intellectuals of the period.



Vedica Kant is a graduate of Oxford University's Middle Eastern Studies program
Robert Upton is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at Oxford University
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)

Episode No. 86
Release date: 28 December 2012
Location: Feriköy, Istanbul
Editing and production by Chris Gratien
Images and bibliography courtesy of Vedica Kant

The audio clip at the beginning of the podcast is a rare recording of the voice of a Punjabi POW in Germany during World War I named Mal Singh. In the recording, which was made in December of 1916, Mal Singh expresses his desire to return home after having been imprisoned by the German army. To hear the entire recording, click here. (Source: Amin Mughal Links)

Note for the listener: This podcast is based on primary source research. It also makes use of publicly available information and draws from the following works below, which are also mentioned during the course of the episode. For the purposes of academic citation, we encourage you to consult these works as well. 

Select Bibliography

Santanu Das (ed.), Race, Empire and First World War Writing (New York: Cambridge. University Press, 2011)

David Omissi, Indian Voices of the Great War: Soldier's Letters, 1914-18 (Palgrave, 1999)

Cemalettin Taşkıran, Ana Ben Ölemedim: I. Dünya Savaşında Türk Esirlerleri (İş Bankası Yayınları, 2011)

S. D. Pradhan, ‘Indian Army and the First World War’ in DeWitt C. Ellinwood and S. D. Pradhan, India and World War I (New Delhi, Manohar, 1978).

Briton Cooper Busch, Britain, India, and the Arabs (University of. California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London, 1971)

India's Contribution to the Great War (Calcutta, Government of India, 1923)

Select Images

Indian Troops Manning Lewis Gun on Mesopotamian Front, 1918
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive
Indian military engineers in Mesopotamia, World War I
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive
Moslem Indian Guard at the Mosque of Omar [Dome of the Rock], 1917
Source: Library of Congress
Indian cavalry passing through Haifa following the city's capture, 1918
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive
Indian Troops, World War I
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive
Indian Soldiers in France, c1914-15
Source: Library of Congress
Indian Troops at Gas Mask Drill, World War I
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive

Wounded Indian Soldier on Western Front, World War I
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive

Indian soldiers at Rufiji, German East Africa, 1916
Source: Imperial War Museum Photographic Archive
Ottoman Prisoners of War in Bellary, India, 1916
Soruce: 7/24 Magazin
Ottoman Prisoners of War in Burma, World War I
Source: Vedica Kant
Letter from Ottoman prisoner of war in Burma to wife in Istanbul, 1916
Source: K-Haber


Dec 20, 2012

Christmas and Diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire During WWI

85.     History and the Holidays

Christmas Day in Ottoman Bethlehem
American Colony, c1900-1920 (LOC)
World War I disrupted all aspects of life in Europe and the Ottoman Empire. Within the context of a brutal war, soldiers sought to protect the culturally-symbolic holiday of Christmas from these disruptions through events such as the Christmas Truce of 1914. In the Ottoman Empire, charity organizations and foreign governments worked with the Ottoman state to secure Christmas meals and privileges to contact their families for prisoners being kept in Anatolia. However, all-out war also brought conflict, violence, and politics to the Christmas season. In this podcast, we examine a few Christmas cases from the WWI period based on research in the Ottoman archives.


MP3 File

Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)

Citation: "Christmas and Diplomacy in the Ottoman Empire During World War I," Chris Gratien, Ottoman History Podcast, No. 85 (December 20, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/12/christmas-prisoners-of-world-war-europe-us.html.


~ To read the archival documents associated with this episode, see our article in Tozsuz Evrak ~


Music: Fairuz - Kenna Nzayyen Sajra Sgheeri and Talj Talj

Dec 17, 2012

Palestinianism and Zionism in the Ottoman Empire | Louis Fishman

While it is common knowledge that Zionist settlement in Palestine began during the Ottoman era, conventional historiography has under-emphasized the extent to which the issue of Palestine was a question that initially emerged in an Ottoman political and social context. In this podcast, Dr. Louis Fishman restores this Ottoman context and explores debates between Jewish and Palestinian Ottoman subjects during the Second Constitutional Era.



Louis Fishman is an Assistant Professor of History at CUNY-Brooklyn College (see faculty page)
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)
Emrah Safa Gürkan is a recent Ph.D. from the department of history at Georgetown University currently teaching at Bahçeşehir University in Istanbul (see academia.edu)

Episode No. 84
Release Date: 16 December 2012
Location: Kurtuluş, Istanbul
Editing and Production: Chris Gratien
Bibliography courtesy of Louis Fishman
Citation: "Palestinianism and Zionism in the Ottoman Empire," Louis Fishman, Chris Gratien, and Emrah Safa Gürkan, Ottoman History Podcast, No. 84 (December 16, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/12/palestine-zionism-settlement-nationalism.html.

Select Bibliography


Louis Fishman. "The Haram al-Sharif Incident: Palestinian Notables versus the Ottoman Administration," Journal of Palestine Studies, 135, Vol. XXXXIV, Number 3, Spring 2005.

Louis Fishman. "The Emergence of a “Jewish” Question in Istanbul 1908-1914: Zionism, Anti-Semitism, and the 1911 Ottoman Parliament Debate on Zionism," in Ben-Bassat, Yuval and Eyal Ginio (eds.), Late Ottoman Palestine: The Period of Young Turk Rule (London: I.B. Tauris, 2011).

Recommend readings from other authors:

Ben-Bassat, Yuval and Eyal Ginio (eds.), Late Ottoman Palestine: The Period of Young Turk Rule (London: I.B. Tauris, 2011).

Campos, Michelle. Ottoman Brothers: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Early Twentieth-Century Palestine (Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2011)

Jacobson, Avigail. From Empire to Empire: Jerusalem Between Ottoman and British Rule (Space, Place, and Society) (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press. 2011)

Khalidi, Rashid. Palestinian Identity: The Construction of Modern National Consciousness. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997)

Tamari, Salim. Mountains Against the Sea: Essays on Palestinian Society and Culture (Berkeley, University of California Press. 2009)

Music: Reem Kelani

Last Ottoman Nebi Musa Celebration, 1917
Anti-Zionist Demonstrations, 1920
British personnel conducting searches following Nebi Musa riots, 1920

Dec 9, 2012

Hello Anatolia: Interview with Filmmaker Valantis Stamelos

Smyrna c.1900 (Lazaretto - LOC)
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/89715616/
After centuries of living side by side with other communities in the Ottoman Empire, most of the Greeks and Orthodox Christians of Anatolia were exiled to Greece and elsewhere in the aftermath of World War I, the Greek occupation of Western Anatolia, the Turkish War of Independence, and the population exchanges that followed. Since then, reconciliation between Greece and Turkey has been hampered not only by an unwillingness of many to come to terms with this past but also an inability to imagine a different future. In this episode, we talk with Valantis Stamelos, a Greek-American filmmaker whose documentary entitled "Hello Anatolia" tells the story of his journey of return to establish new roots in Izmir, Turkey as well as get in touch with the old roots of the city's Greek community. 



Valantis Stamelos is a filmmaker based in Izmir, Turkey (see Crescent Street Films website)
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)

Check out the trailer for "Hello Anatolia":

 

Episode music from Hello Anatolia soundtrack by Yannis Saoulis

Dec 1, 2012

Zanzibar: Imperial Visions and Ottoman Connections with Jeffery Dyer


Zanzibar, Street scene
Matson Photo Service, 1936
Zanzibar and the Swahili coast of East Africa sat at the interface of the Ottoman world, the Indian Ocean, and the rich mainland. When Portuguese sailors began to enter the Indian Ocean trade networks during the sixteenth century, the region also came within the sphere of European maritime empires. However,  before Zanzibar entered into any lasting a colonial relationship with a European power (the British at the end of the nineteenth century), a dynasty based in Muscat (modern-day Oman) that had its own imperial visions controlled the island. In this podcast, Jeffrey Dyer reconstructs the historical context of early nineteenth-century Zanzibar, the role of the Busaidi sultans of Muscat and Zanzibar among global empires, and connections to late-Ottoman dabbling in imperial influence.


MP3 File

Jeffery Dyer is a PhD candidate at Boston College studying Ottoman global history
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)

Citation: "Zanzibar: Imperial Visions and Ottoman Connections," Jeffery Dyer and Chris Gratien, Ottoman History Podcast, No. 82 (December 1, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/11/zanzibar-swahili-coast-africa-imperialism.html.

Zanzibar motor road bordered by clove trees and stately palms,1936
Maston Photo Service (LOC - http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/mpc2010003156/PP/)

Drying cloves at Zanzibar, c. 1890-1923 - Carpenter Collection (LOC - http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2001705556/)
Zanzibar, Bags of cloves, 1936 - Matson Photo Service (LOC - http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/mpc2010003176/PP/)
Zanzibar fruit market, 1936 - Matson Photo Service (LOC - http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/mpc2010003166/PP/)
Note for the listener: This podcast is based in part on primary source research. It also makes use of publicly available information and draws from the following works below, which are also mentioned during the course of the episode. For the purposes of academic citation, we encourage you to consult these works as well. 

Select Bibliography

Benett, Norman Robert. A History of the Arab State of Zanzibar. London: Methuen & Co., 1978

Burton, Richard Francis.  Zanzibar: City, Island, Coast.  London: Tinsley, 1872.

Kavas, Ahmed. "Dogu Afrika Sahlinde Osmanli Hakimiyeti: Kuzey Somali'de Zeyla Iskelesinin Konumu (1265-1334/1849-1916)" Islam Arastirmalari Dergisi 5 (Istanbul, 2001) 109-134.

Kumar, Ravinder.  “The Dismemberment of Oman and British Policy Towards the Persian Gulf.” Islamic Culture. Vol. 36 (1962): 8-19.

Toledano, Ehud R. The Ottoman Slave Trade and Its Suppression, 1840-1890. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press, 1982.  

Uğur, Hatice. Osmanlı Afrika'sında Bir Sultanlık Zengibar. Küre Yayınları 2005.


Episode Music: Master Musicians of Tanzania - Lukunzi