Ottoman Migrations from the Eastern Mediterranean | Andrew Arsan

52. Ottoman Migrations

Migration has been a major vehicle of change in human history, and the modern world has in many ways been shaped by the activities and experiences of migrants. In this episode, Andrew Arsan discusses the historical experience of Arab migrants who left regions of the Eastern Mediterranean such as Syria and Mount Lebanon and the economic and social transformations that resulted both in the region as well as in the mahjar.

Andrew Arsan is a postdoctoral research associate at the Near East Studies Department at Princeton University focusing on the modern history of Syria and Lebanon (see academia.edu)
Zachary J. Foster is a Ph.D student in the Near East Studies Department at Princeton University focusing on the modern Middle East

Select Bibliography


Akram Khater, Inventing home: emigration, gender, and the middle class in Lebanon, 1870-1920 (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001).

Albert Hourani and Nadim Shehadi, eds., The Lebanese in the world: a century years of emigration (London: IB Tauris, 1992).

Sarah Gualtieri, Between Arab and White: race and ethnicity in the early Syrian American diaspora (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2009).

Ignacio Klich and Jeffrey Lesser, eds., Arab and Jewish immigrants in Latin America: images and realities (New York, NY: Routledge, 1998).

John Tofik Karam, Another arabesque: Syrian-Lebanese ethnicity in neoliberal Brazil (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2007).

1 comment:

Adam Williams said...

Mr. Arsan mentioned in the podcast that he went to a conference where they watched a documentary on Ottoman migration. Would it be possible to contact him for the name of the documentary and perhaps add it to the bibliography?

My great-grand-parents left Beirut at the turn of the century and settled in Manchester where they raised their 8 children. After my great-grand-father died my great-grand-mother moved her family to Jamaica during the depression but they eventually settled in Trinidad as they had trade contacts there. We have been in Trinidad ever since. There are very few Lebanese families in Trinidad but there is an affluent and Syrian minority.

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