Aug 16, 2012

Karamanli Culture in the Ottoman Empire | Ayça Baydar

Ottoman society was comprised of many different communities with overlapping linguistic, ethnic, and confessional identities. One such community, the Karamanlis of Anatolia, was a group that spoke Turkish and shared in a common Anatolian folk culture but maintained a Greek Orthodox religious belief and used the Greek alphabet in their Turkish language writings. During the nineteenth century, with the rise of ethnic nationalism and tensions between the Ottoman Empire (later Turkey) and Greece in particular, this group was caught in the middle. In this podcast, Ayça Baydar gives an overview of Karamanli culture and self-identification throughout this period of confusion and transformation.



Ayça Baydar is a PhD student at SOAS in London focusing on Ottoman history (see academia.edu)
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)

Citation: "Karamanli Culture in the Ottoman Empire: Hybridity, Identity and Ethnicity," Ayça Baydar and Chris Gratien, Ottoman History Podcast, No. 65 (August 16, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/karamanli-culture-in-ottoman-empire.html.

Note for the listener: Although this podcast is based in part on primary source research, it is also a synthesis of publicly available information and draws extensively from the following works below, which are also mentioned during the course of the episode. For the purposes of academic citation, we encourage you to consult these works.

Select Bibliography

Balta, E., (2010). Beyond The Language Frontier. Istanbul: Isis Press.

Clogg, R., (1999). 'A Millet within a Millet: the Karamanlides' In Gondicas D. & Issawi. Clogg (Eds) Ottoman Greeks in the Age of Nationalism. Princeton: Darwin Press. 115-142.

Karpat, K., (1982). Millets and Nationality: The Roots of the Incongruity of Nation and State in the Post-Ottoman Era.

Turcologica 83. (2010). Cries and Whispers in Karamanlidika Books. Ed. by Evangelia Balta and Matthias Kappler. Harrassowitz Verlag. Wiesbaden.

Aug 13, 2012

Dreams in Ottoman Society, Culture, and Cosmos

with Aslı Niyazioğlu

hosted by Chris Gratien and Nir Shafir

This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled History of Science, Ottoman or Otherwise.
 
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Dreams are an essential part of the human experience but are attributed different significance in various times and places. For many Ottomans, dreams were a forum for the revelation of hidden or unseen knowledge, and dream narratives as well as their interpretations found their way into many Ottoman texts. In this podcast, Aslı Niyazioğlu explains the role of dreams within Ottoman society, focusing on dream narratives in biographical dictionaries of the early modern era, and we discuss possible changes over time in the understanding of dreams in the Ottoman world. 

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Aslı Niyazioğlu is an Assistant Professor of History at Koç University in Istanbul
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University.
Nir Shafir is a PhD candidate at UCLA focusing on history of science and intellectual history of the Ottoman Empire

Episode No. 64
Release date: 13 August 2012
Location: Etiler, Istanbul
Editing and Production by Chris Gratien
Bibliography courtesy of Aslı Niyazioğlu

Citation: "Dreams in Ottoman Society, Culture, and Cosmos," Aslı Niyazioğlu, Chris Gratien, and Nir Shafir, Ottoman History Podcast, No. 64 (August 13, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/dreams-in-ottoman-society-culture-and.html.

Select Bibliography

Niyazioğlu, Aslı. “Dreams, Ottoman Biography Writing, and the Halveti-Sünbüli Sheikhs of Sixteenth Century Istanbul” in Many Ways of Speaking About the Self, Middle Eastern Ego-Documents in Arabic, Persian and Turkish (14th-20th Century), Ralph Elger and Yavuz Erköse eds. (Harrassowitz, Wiesbaden: 2010): 171-185.

“Dreams of the Very Special Dead: Nevizade Atai’s (d.1635) Reasons for Composing His Mesnevis” Archivum Ottomanicum 25 (2008): 221-33.

“Aşık Çelebi’ye Rüyaların Söyledikleri” in Aşık Çelebi ve Şairler Tezkeresi Üzerine Yazılar, co-edited with Hatice Aynur, (İstanbul: Koç University Press, 2011):71-85.

Ahmet Tunç Şen "A Mirror for Princes, A Fiction for Readers: The Habname of Veysi and Dream Narratives in Ottoman Turkish Literature" Journal of Turkish Literature 8 (2011): 41-65

Cemal Kafadar “Mütereddit Bir Mutasavvıf: Üsküplü Asiye Hatun’un Rüya Defteri 1641-43” in his Kim Var İmiş Biz Burada Yoğ İken (İstanbul: Metis, 2009): 122-155.

Cornell H. Fleischer, “Secretaries’ Dreams: Augury and Angst in Ottoman Scribal Service,” in Armağan, Festschrift für Andreas Tietze, ed. Ingeborg Baldoruf and Suraiya Faroqhi (Prag: Enigma Corporation, 1994), 77-88.

Dror Zeevi, "Dream Interpretation and the Unconcious" in his Producing Desire: Changing Sexual Discourse in the Ottoman Middle East, 1500-1900 ( Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California, 2006): 99-125.

Gottfried Hagen, “Dreaming Osmans: Of History and Meaning" and Özlem Felek "(Re-)Creating Image and Identity: Dreams and Visions as a Means of Murad III's Self-Fashioning" both in Özlem Felek and Alexander D. Knysh (ed.) Dreams and Visions in Islamic Societies, (Albany: State University of New York), 2012: 99-123 and 249-273.

Aug 7, 2012

Evliya Çelebi: Early Modern Travel and Ottoman Sensibilities | Madeleine Elfenbein

63.   Adventure: Brought to You By the Ottoman State

While there are many travel narratives from the early modern era, few match Evliya Çelebi's Seyahatnâme in terms of richness and detail. As an Ottoman gentleman or çelebi, Evliya was able to travel throughout Eastern Europe and the Middle East and record his observations, leaving historians a rich archive of material about Ottoman society during the seventeenth century. Yet, Evliya's own sensibilities and mentality as reflected in his narratives may tell us even more about the time and place that he inhabited. In this episode, Madeleine Elfenbein gives us some clues regarding the mentality of this celebrated figure through excerpts from the Seyahatnâme.


Madeleine Elfenbein is a PhD student at University of Chicago studying Ottoman history (see academia.edu)
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)
Elçin Arabacı is a PhD student at Georgetown University studying the urban and social history of the Ottoman Empire (see academia.edu)

Citation: "Evliya Çelebi: Early Modern Travel and Ottoman Sensibilities," Madeleine Elfenbein, Chris Gratien and Elçin Arabacı. Ottoman History Podcast, No. 63 (August 7, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/evliya-celebi-early-modern-travel-and.html.

Note for the listener: Although this podcast is based in part on primary source research, it is also a synthesis of publicly available information and draws extensively from the following works below, which are also mentioned during the course of the episode. For the purposes of academic citation, we encourage you to consult these works.

Select Bibliography

Robert Dankoff and Sooyoung Kim, An Ottoman Traveler: Selections From the Book of Travels of Evliya Çelebi (London: Eland Publishing Ltd., 2011).

Dankoff, An Ottoman Mentality: The World of Evliya Çelebi (Leiden: Brill, 2006).

Nuran Tezcan and Semih Tezcan, eds. Evliya Çelebi ( Kültür ve Turizm Bakanlığı Yayınları, 2012).

Hakan Karateke and Hatice Aynur, eds. Evliya Çelebi Seyahatnamesi'nin Yazılı Kaynakları (AnkaraTürk Tarih Kurumu Basımevi, Ankara, 2012).

Hasan Javadi and Willem Floor, Travels in Iran and the Caucasus in 1647 and 1654 (Washington, D.C.: Mage Publishers, 2010).

Virginia H. Aksan and Daniel Goffman, eds., The Early Modern Ottomans: Remapping the Empire (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007).

Aug 1, 2012

Sex, Love, and Worship in Classical Ottoman Texts

with Selim Kuru 

hosted by Chris Gratien and Oscar Aguirre-Mandujano 

This episode is part of a series on Women, Gender, and Sex in Ottoman history

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Historians have used classical Ottoman texts to explore social issues such as sexuality, with compiled manuscripts from various literary genres often forming a data-mine for historical information. However, this type of selective reading has often distorted or obscured the original meaning and context of literary works. Sometimes, texts that appear erotic or sexual in nature such as gazel could have been intended for an entirely different purpose. In this episode, Dr. Selim Kuru examines the concepts of mahbub peresti (worship of the beloved) and gulâm pâregi (pederasty) and various motifs concerning male beauty in the shehrengiz (Gibb's "city-thrillers") genre in search of a more contextualized approach these would-be erotic texts.

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Selim Kuru is a Professor of Ottoman and Turkish studies at University of Washington in Seattle (see academia.edu)
Chris Gratien is a PhD candidate studying the history of the modern Middle East at Georgetown University (see academia.edu)
Oscar Aguirre-Mandujano is a PhD student at University of Washington in Seattle studying Ottoman history and literature

Episode No. 62
Release date: 1 August 2012
Location: Ottoman Summer School, Cunda, Turkey
Editing and Production by Chris Gratien

Citation: "Sex, Love, and Worship in Classical Ottoman Texts." Selim Kuru, Oscar Aguirre-Mandujano, and Chris Gratien. Ottoman History Podcast, No. 62 (August 1, 2012) http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/boys-god-and-beauty-approaching-sex-and.html.



Select Bibliography:






Music: Ali Avaz - Şeker Oğlan