Mar 27, 2016

Yemeğin Politik Tarihi

Burak Onaran

Ufuk Adak'ın sunuculuğuyla
yemeğin politik tarihinden bahsettik.

Bölümü dinle
Feed | iTunes | Hipcast | Soundcloud

Ottoman History Podcast'in bu bölümünde, Mimar Sinan Güzel Sanatlar Üniversitesi Sosyoloji Bölümü'nden tarihçi Burak Onaran ile yemeğin ve mutfağın siyasi ve toplumsal tarihini konuşuyoruz. Son dönem Osmanlı İmparatorluğu'nda kamu diplomasisi açısından Osmanlı mutfağını nasıl okuyabiliriz? Osmanlı mutfağından Türk mutfağına geçiş, mutfağın ve yemeğin ulusallaşması süreci nasıl gerçekleşmiştir? Cumhuriyet'in kuruluşundan 1970'lere Türkiye'deki mutfak kültüründe nasıl bir değişim yaşanmıştır? Bu podcastte, bu soruların yanıtlarını arıyoruz.

Mar 23, 2016

Foodways in Medieval Anatolia

with Nicolas Trépanier

hosted by Nir Shafir and Polina Ivanova

Nir Shafir and Polina Ivanova with Nicolas Trépanier.
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | Hipcast | Soundcloud

At the heart of medieval political economies were a variety of practices, structures, and activities that revolved around the production and distribution of food. In this episode, Nicolas Trépanier discusses his research for Foodways and Daily Life in Medieval Anatolia, which examines life in the early Ottoman Empire through the lens of food and drink. We discuss diverse subjects from agrarian labor and temporality to religion and commerce in order to understand how people lived through what and how they ate.

Mar 18, 2016

Venetian Physicians in the Ottoman Empire

with Valentina Pugliano

hosted by Nir Shafir

This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled History of Science, Ottoman or Otherwise.
 
Download the series
Podcast Feed | iTunes | Hipcast | Soundcloud

Starting in the fifteenth century, medical doctors from the Italian peninsula began accompanying Venetian consular missions to cities in the Mamluk and Ottoman empires. These doctors treated not only Venetian consular officials, but also local artisans and rulers. In this podcast, Valentina Pugliano discusses the experiences of these travelling doctors both in the Italian peninsula and in the Middle East. We explore their interactions with the local population and their effect on the medical ecology of the Middle East as well as the sources we use to write such histories. Together, the experiences of these doctors point to the connected histories of medicine and science in the early modern Mediterranean.

Mar 15, 2016

The American University of Beirut and the British Mandates

with Hilary Falb Kalisman

hosted by Huma Gupta, Chris Gratien, and Nir Shafir

Hilary Falb talks about her research on AUB during the mandate period.
Download the podcast
Podcast Feed | iTunes | Hipcast | Soundcloud

During the late Ottoman period, the Syrian Protestant College in Beirut became a leading center of higher education in the Eastern Mediterranean and for the Arab world in particular. With the establishment of British and French Mandates in the Middle East following the First World War, the Syrian Protestant College--now known as the American University of Beirut--became an educational hub not only for the Arab elite and middle class but also for local teachers and bureaucrats that would serve in the colonial mandate governments. In this episode, Hilary Falb Kalisman shares her research on the history of scholarship students from the British Mandates and their life at AUB during the interwar period, highlighting dimensions of class, nation, and transnationalism that emerged out of the educational experience and tracing the impacts of their education as they returned to serve in mandate and post-mandate independent governments of Iraq, Palestine, and Transjordan.


Mar 12, 2016

Women and the American Protestant Mission in Lebanon

with Ellen Fleischmann & Christine Lindner

hosted by Susanna Ferguson

This episode is part of a series entitled Women, Gender, and Sex in the Ottoman World

Download the series
Podcast Feed | iTunes | Hipcast | Soundcloud

In this episode, Ellen Fleischmann and Christine Lindner discuss the history of women and gender and the American Protestant Mission in Lebanon. How did American missionary women experience and transform the American Protestant project in the Levant in the 19th and 20th centuries? How did American missionaries, both women and men, interact with women from Beirut and Mt. Lebanon, both those who converted and those who did not? And how did these heterogeneous interactions produce new experiences of womanhood, family, power, and authority in the Levant? Drs. Fleischmann and Lindner reflect on these questions based on their considerable research in Lebanon and elsewhere, and also share their thoughts about sources and strategies for tracing women's history and missionary history in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman Levant.

Mar 8, 2016

Gender, Politics, and Passion in the Christian Middle East


. Scholars have long neglected the Middle East’s Christian communities in general and Christian women in particular. In this episode, Akram Khater draws attention to the biography of Hindiyya al-'Ujaimi (1720-1798) to explore the religious and political upheavals of 18th-century Aleppo and Mount Lebanon. Hindiyya’s story speaks to the dynamic history of the Maronite Church, the fraught encounter between Arab and European Christianities, and the role of faith as a historical force. For half a century, she held as much sway over the Maronite Church as any other cleric. The extent of her influence won her powerful enemies in Lebanon and the Vatican. Hindiyya weathered one inquisition but was eventually convicted of heresy and confined to a solitary cell for the final decade of her life. The story of her ascent and demise illuminates gendered aspects of piety and politics in the Christian Middle East.

Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | Soundcloud

Scholars have long neglected the Middle East’s Christian communities in general and Christian women in particular. In this episode, Akram Khater draws attention to the biography of Hindiyya al-'Ujaimi (1720-1798) to explore the religious and political upheavals of 18th-century Aleppo and Mount Lebanon. Hindiyya’s story speaks to the dynamic history of the Maronite Church, the  fraught encounter between Arab and European Christianities, and the role of faith as a historical force. For half a century, she held as much sway over the Maronite Church as any other cleric. The extent of her influence won her powerful enemies in Lebanon and the Vatican. Hindiyya weathered one inquisition but was eventually convicted of heresy and confined to a solitary cell for the final decade of her life. The story of her ascent and demise illuminates gendered aspects of piety and politics in the Christian Middle East.

Mar 4, 2016

Ottoman Ulema and the Second Constitutional Revolution

with Yakoob Ahmed

hosted by Taylan Güngör

This episode is part of an ongoing series entitled Rethinking the Ottoman State.
 
Download the episode
Podcast Feed | iTunes | Hipcast | Soundcloud

The conventional story of the 1908 Revolution in the Ottoman Empire is that of the Young Turks and a multi-confessional alliance of political parties usurping the authoritarian rule of Sultan Abdul Hamid II. The learned class of Muslim notables, the ulema, are usually portrayed as apprehensive bystanders threatened with marginalization by the restoration of the Ottoman constitution. But as our guest Yakoob Ahmed explains, ulema engagement with the revolution and the parliamentary elections that followed was robust. In this episode, we explore that engagement through a discussion of the writings and activities of the Ottoman ulema during the transformative period of 1908-1912.