Russian Hajj

with Eileen Kane

hosted by Chris Gratien

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Just as the Ottoman Empire is often known for the discourse of Pan-Islam during the 19th century, the Russian Empire is similarly known for its prominent role as the foremost Christian rival of the Ottomans. Yet the long and deep relationship between the Russian Empire and Islam has received comparatively little historical scrutiny. In this podcast, Eileen Kane discusses her recent book entitled Russian Hajj (Cornell University Press), which considers the role of the Russian administrators as rulers over Muslim subjects. We explore how the Russia's relationship with its millions of Muslim subjects transformed during the 19th century and how the Russian Empire became increasingly involved in Muslim matters such as the hajj pilgrimage as it sought to expand its imperial reach.



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Eileen Kane is Associate Professor of History and Director of the Global Islamic Studies program at Connecticut College. Her research focuses on the historical relationship between Russia and the Middle East. (see faculty page)
Chris Gratien holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University's Department of History. His research focuses on the social and environmental history of the Ottoman Empire and the modern Middle East. (see academia.edu)

CREDITS

Episode No. 219
Release Date: 7 January 2016
Recording Location: Connecticut College
Editing and production by Chris Gratien
Musical excerpts from archive.org uploaded by fidikaBaglamamin Dugumu - Necmiye Ararat and MuzafferNazmiye - Rizeli Sadik
Field recordings of Istanbul by Chris Gratien
Bibliography courtesy of Eileen Kane

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
Eileen Kane, Russian Hajj (Cornell
University Press)

Münir Atalar, Osmanlı Devletinde Surre-i Hümay.n ve Surre Alayları (Ankara: Diyanet İşleri Başkanlığı, 1991).

Daniel Brower, “Russian Roads to Mecca: Religious Tolerance and Muslim Pilgrimage in the
Russian Empire,” Slavic Review 55, no. 3 (1996): [pages]

Naim R. Farooqi, “Moguls, Ottomans, and Pilgrims: Protecting the Routes
to Mecca in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries,” International History Review 10, no. 2
(May 1988): 198–220

Suraiya Faroqhi, Pilgrims and Sultans: The Hajj under the Ottomans (London: I.B. Tauris, 1994)

Eileen Kane, "Odessa as a Hajj Hub, 1880s-1920s," in Russia in Motion: Cultures of Human Mobility since 1850, eds. John Randolph and Eugene M. Avrutin (UI Press, 2012)

Eileen Kane, Russian Hajj: Empire and the Pilgrimage to Mecca (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015).

Laffan, Michael Francis. Islamic Nationhood and Colonial Indonesia: The Umma below the
Winds. London: Routledge, 2003.

R. D. McChesney, “The Central Asian Hajj-Pilgrimage in the Time of the Early Modern
Empires,” in Safavid Iran and Her Neighbors, ed. Michel Mazzaoui (Salt Lake City: University of
Utah Press, 2003), 129–156

David Motadel, Islam and the European Empires (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014)

Alexandre Papas et al. (eds.) Central Asian Pilgrims: Hajj Routes and Pious Visits between Central Asia and the Hijaz (Berlin: Klaus Schwarz, 2012).

Michael N. Pearson, Pilgrimage to Mecca: The Indian Experience, 1500–1800 (Princeton, NJ: Markus Wiener Publishers, 1996)

F.E. Peters, The Hajj: Pilgrimage to Mecca (Princeton, 1994)

Andrew Petersen, The Medieval and Ottoman Hajj Route in Jordan: An Archaeological and
Historical Study (Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2012)

Abdul-Karim Rafeq, “Damascus and the Pilgrim Caravan,” in Modernity and Culture: From the
Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean, ed. Leila Tarazi Fawaz and C. A. Bayly (New York: Columbia
University Press, 2002), 130–143.

William R. Roff, “Sanitation and Security: The Imperial Powers and the Nineteenth-Century
Hajj,” Arabian Studies 6 (1982): 143–160

John Slight, The British Empire and the Hajj, 1865-1956 (HUP, 2015)

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